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A Blog on my Random Musings

20 Oct hellyeahhomestuck:


These are the kinds of kids that are going to change the world.

hellyeahhomestuck:

These are the kinds of kids that are going to change the world.

20 Oct

But the funny thing about that is we (as readers/viewers) sometimes miss out on information that might have been interesting. The author didn’t think it was, but fans? Most fans will soak up content like a sponge (see: LotR extended editions, cutscenes, etc). And so we’re likely to ask ridiculous questions like “What is laundry day like at Avengers Tower?” - not because it’s important to the narrative, but because we’re curious.

Not to mention: every narrator is an unreliable narrator. Especially the ones who seem the most straightforward. Which means there are a wealth of stories not being told hiding right behind the story that is.

Which, I think, gives an inkling of the primary difference between original fic and fanfic: original fic is declarative, saying “here is the story, these are the important events and characters and aspects of the world,” while fanfic is exploratory (even when it’s got a cracking good plot).

Fanfic exists in the interstices, in the ellipses and the enjambment. Fanfiction exists in the moment before the wave function collapses. A transformative work doesn’t actually transform the original media it is based off of (because the original medium exists in a fixed state and cannot be literally changed by fans unless the canon creators allow it to be so) so much as take the essential structure of the narrative and the characters and twist it, turn it, rotate and reflect it until we’ve built a fractal around it.

“Fandom as Inhabitation of Negative Space” (via cypress-tree)

JESUS FUCK THIS HAS HOW MANY NOTES??

(via saathi1013)

When you get to the end of a story and want to fill in all the blanks, that’s not necessarily the sign of a lack in the original. Sometimes it’s just because you don’t want to leave this amazing new world that has been created!

(via captain-snark)

(Source: bethanyactually)

20 Oct

karenhurley:

This campaign is great, really makes you look closer instead of just and quick stereotypical glance 

GSR Entrance Hall System

Advertising Agency: SPR Agency, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil Via

20 Oct

akalittleone:

No sympathy for rapists, no sympathy for abusers, no sympathy for those who side with them. No excuses for their behavior, no justifications, no exceptions.

20 Oct
  • show creator: i know what you are
  • bi character: say it. out loud.
  • show creator: ...not interested in labels
20 Oct

thebitterbite:

officialorangejuice:

what others call a rebellious phase I call the sudden realization I don’t deserve to be treated like garabge

IT HAS BEEN SAID

20 Oct

Reblog if you have read fan fiction better than some published books

bumblegabe:

Help me prove a point

20 Oct

bingedrunk:

when straight people talk to gays

(Source: versaceslut)

20 Oct

drop-deaddream:

"And these are your only two options?"

How many times do you think Peggy has looked at a no-win scenario in her life and said those exact words? 

Growing up she learned she could either be a mother or a wife. Trying to help the war effort she learned she could either be a nurse or work in weapons production. In 1946 she was told she could either become a glorified secretary or find a job outside intelligence.

Peggy Carter spends her entire life finding ways to circumvent the box. She’s looked society in the face, and over and over again she’s challenged it, questioned it, and outsmarted it, even triumphed over it. And it’s because she has the audacity, always, to raise her eyebrow and refuse to be silenced, and because she isn’t ever too afraid to ask the question that matters to her most: and these are your only two options?

(Source: spidermonkey-s)

20 Oct

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls